Morning Glory

Morning Glories are a flowering vine that's trumpet shaped blooms open in the morning and close in the afternoon. The flowers are typically blue, white, purple, or pink. Because of their sensitivity to light, they don't make good cut flowers, but they are quite easy to take care of as garden plants.  Like many of the other flowers we have talked about on this journal, many varieties of morning glory are native to Asia.  They hold special significance in Japan, where they are regarded as a symbol of summertime.  In the mid 1800's the morning glory was all the rage in Japanese culture, and there were whole books published about the flower.  

They grow wild in Chicago and I spotted them everywhere on my recent trip to England. I saw them growing alongside other wildflowers holding them all together. It brought me back to my childhood when I grew a sunflower house using morning glory vines to twine the giant sunflowers together. It makes perfect sense then, that Morning Glories symbolize affection, that unstoppable force which holds us together (not to get sappy or anything).

If you’re looking for more articles to read on Floral Symbolism, check this out: http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/how-flowerobsessed-victorians-encoded-messages-in-bouquets

xoxo,

Persephone

This print is from a book on morning glories written by Yokoyama Masana in 1854.  The art was created by Hattori Sessai.  

This print is from a book on morning glories written by Yokoyama Masana in 1854.  The art was created by Hattori Sessai.  

 

Mary Simmons